EnidNzingha

After my paternal grandmother... And a Great Queen.
~ Wednesday, October 2 ~
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onedirectionfacingmecca:

Flowers for the Dead, Gerardo Castro

onedirectionfacingmecca:

Flowers for the Dead, Gerardo Castro


5,027 notes
reblogged via abstrackafricana
~ Tuesday, April 9 ~
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(Source: rosiemyranda)


2,088 notes
reblogged via black-culture
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soulkingsk:

Natural I love it 

soulkingsk:

Natural I love it 

(Source: femalerappers)


4,732 notes
reblogged via black-culture
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blackhistoryalbum:

HAVE BIKE, WILL TRAVEL | 1911African American bicyclists, Denver, CO by Charles S. Lillybridge. Courtesy of the Colorado Historical Society.

blackhistoryalbum:

HAVE BIKE, WILL TRAVEL | 1911
African American bicyclists, Denver, CO by Charles S. Lillybridge. Courtesy of the Colorado Historical Society.


559 notes
reblogged via black-culture
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black-culture:

The Adinkra symbols are part of a rich African tradition dating back beyond the 17th century, and they are believed to have their origin from Gyaman - a former kingdom in today’s Ivory Coast. The stunning motifs were developed by the Asante people of Ghana, West Africa, who evolved the unique art of Adinkra printing cloths, made and used exclusively by royalty and spiritual leaders for sacred ceremonies. The meaning of each symbol derives from a proverb, history, events, human attitude, animal behavior, plants and shapes of inanimate and man-made objects.  The Adinkra tradition continues to flourish in modern times and the number of symbols continues to grow. In contemporary Ghana, the symbols and their meanings are still very much used to convey a message through a wide range of products and crafts, including clothing accessories, interior design, carpentry, architure etc.

black-culture:

The Adinkra symbols are part of a rich African tradition dating back beyond the 17th century, and they are believed to have their origin from Gyaman - a former kingdom in today’s Ivory Coast. The stunning motifs were developed by the Asante people of Ghana, West Africa, who evolved the unique art of Adinkra printing cloths, made and used exclusively by royalty and spiritual leaders for sacred ceremonies. The meaning of each symbol derives from a proverb, history, events, human attitude, animal behavior, plants and shapes of inanimate and man-made objects.

The Adinkra tradition continues to flourish in modern times and the number of symbols continues to grow. In contemporary Ghana, the symbols and their meanings are still very much used to convey a message through a wide range of products and crafts, including clothing accessories, interior design, carpentry, architure etc.


2,014 notes
reblogged via black-culture
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mrsharrisonford:

Bookshelf Necklace

mrsharrisonford:

Bookshelf Necklace


2,604 notes
reblogged via bookshelfporn
~ Sunday, March 31 ~
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ferrarisheppard:

Tupac talking about the Christmas in this photo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAmK_xbLHe4

ferrarisheppard:

Tupac talking about the Christmas in this photo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAmK_xbLHe4

(Source: fuckyeah2pac)


2,933 notes
reblogged via amilcarology
~ Wednesday, February 6 ~
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just me.

just me.


1 note
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alvinepps:

“Honeycomb” illustration by Alvin Epps

alvinepps:

Honeycomb” illustration by Alvin Epps


2,540 notes
reblogged via afro-art-chick
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talented10th:

Poster of Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister, Kwame NKRUMAH

talented10th:

Poster of Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister, Kwame NKRUMAH


5 notes
reblogged via talented10th